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Insect Website Title

Pest Remedies-Beetles:


Beetle, Alfalfa Weevil (Hypera postica)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Curculionidae

Description:

Adults, gray brown to black with short gray hairs, up to 6 mm (1/4"), medium snout. Larvae are white turning green with middorsal stripe. Eggs, shiny yellow and oval.

Life Cycle: Winter at crowns of alfalfa or debris, feed in Spring, then lay eggs in cavities in alfalfa stems.

Hosts/Damage: Plants are stunted or eaten to stub except for woody fibers.

Controls:

Cultural - Time cutting.

Biological - Some parasitoids are available.

Chemical - Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Asparagus (Crioceris asparagi)

Asparagus Beetle

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adult, blue, black or brown with enlarged rear mottled with yellow, tan or orange. Also variety which is orange with black spots. (1/4 inch) 6 mm long. Larva are olive, green to gray with black head and legs.

Range: Throughout U.S.A.

Life Cycle:

Adults fly in to feed on asparagus and lay dark eggs on spears. Adults overwinter in debris. Larva hatch within a week and feed on host for several weeks when they pupate in ground as yellow pupae.  2 - 5 generations per year.

Hosts/Damage:

Tender tips of asparagus are chewed in Spring but later in season adults and larvae chew on stems and ferny leaves.

Controls:

Cultural -

Use row covers to exclude adults. Handpicking. Water spray. Remove debris. Prompt harvesting of asparagus.

Biological - Spined soldier bugs.

Chemical -

Rotenone. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Banded Alder Borer (Rosalia funebris)

Alternate Names: California laurel borer.

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Cerambycidae

Description:

Adult, long-horned beetle, to 38 mm (1-1/2"), prothorax with large centered blue-gray spot, Wing covers have 3 blue-gray bands, 3 white bands and 2 small white spots, head black, antennae long, blue-gray and white with black tips.

Life Cycle: Eggs are laid on bark, larvae tunnel inward to prepare pupal chambers.

Hosts/Damage: Larvae mine California laurel, Oregon ash, New Mexico Willow and Alder.

Controls:

Cultural - zzz

Biological - zzz

Chemical -  Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Banded Cucumber (Diabrotica balteata)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae bandedcucbeetl.gif (46749 bytes)

Description:

Adults, light green with transverse yellow bands across the wings, (1/4 - 3/8 inch) 6 - 10 mm long. Larva, white, 3/8" (10 mm) long, found in soil feeding on roots and in stems, not usually a pest of tomatoes. It has 6 long, brown colored legs. Pupae, found in soil, emerge as adults in about 1 week. Eggs, small, oval, pale yellow and found in soil in clusters of 1 - 12, hatch in 1 week.

Life Cycle:

Adults overwinter in the plant debris. Adults leave their winter sites in late March and adults lay eggs beneath host plants in Spring, from late April to early June. Before cucurbits are available they eat leaves and stems. Larvae burrow into soil at base of host and chew on roots for about 1 - 3 weeks before pupating.

Hosts/Damage:

Adults are minor pest and attack cucumbers, corn, cantaloupes, winter and summer squash, pumpkins, gourds, watermelon, beans, peas, potato, beet, tomato, eggplant and cabbage. They feed on young seedlings causing poor stands and reduced yield. They chew leaves and tender shoots and may girdle the stem. They feed on flowers and gnaw holes in fruit. Adults harbor the bacterial wilt organism (Pseudomonas lachrymans) which they transmit to their host. They also spread cucumber mosaic.

Range: Mexico to Canada but are most abundant and destructive in Southern Florida.

Controls:

Cultural - Plant host resistant varieties. Row covers to exclude adults. Handpick adults. It is vital to eliminate adults early before they have spread diseases to the various host plants. Till field early and remove garden debris. Delay planting.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe). Tachnid fly (Celatoria diabrotica) to parasitize eggs.

Chemical - Sabadilla or rotenone and pyrethrum to kill adults. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Bean Leaf(Cerotoma trifurcata)

Bean Leaf Beetle

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults are reddish-orange to yellow, shiny with a black head and often with black spots and bands; (about 1/4 inch) 6 mm. Larvae are slender, white with dark brown at both ends, segmented and have 6 very small legs near the head. Eggs are orange, lemon shaped and found in small clusters. Pupae are exposed, white and soft-bodied.

Life Cycle:

Adults pass the winter near fields previously planted. They are found under the leaves of the host as soon as the plant emerges. Females lay their eggs in small clusters on the ground near the base of the plants. Eggs hatch and larva feed on the roots and stems for about a month. Full grown larvae form a cell from earth and pupate. About one week later, adults appear. There are at least 2 generations each year in warm climates.

Hosts/Damage:

Bean, pea, cowpeas, soybean, corn and related weeds. Damage is most destructive by the beetles on young plants where they chew round holes in the leaves. Larvae bore into roots and stems. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Damage to older plants usually results in rough lesions and reduced quality.

Distribution: Mostly in Southeastern U.S. but ranges to Canada and New Mexico.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles. Try to time planting host between 2 beetle generations. Remove debris from garden. Till field.

Biological - Unknown.

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Buffalo Carpet (Anthrenus scrophulariae)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Dermestidae

Description:

Adult, black and gray mottled pattern on wing covers up to 4 mm (5/32"), short antennae, very common.

Life Cycle: Adults emerge in Spring and are common on flowers and inside of windows in infested areas.

Hosts/Damage: Larvae commonly feed on woolen fabrics, dried animal products and dried insects.

Controls:

Cultural - Keep fabrics clean and in tightly sealed containers, keep any items in sealed containers.

Biological -

Chemical - Use mothballs with woolens. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


 Beetle, Carrot (Ligyrus gibbosus)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Scarabaeidae Carrot Beetle

Description:

Adult is about (1/2 inch) 12 to 13 mm and reddish brown or black with dimpled shell. Larva is bluish-white with brown head, curved and about (1 inch) 25 mm long. Eggs are whitish.

Life Cycle: Eggs laid in early Spring in the soil. One generation per year. Overwinters as adult in soil.

Hosts/Damage:

Beets, carrots, celery, corn, parsley, parsnips, potato. Larvae chews roots of various grain crops. Adults chew on stems and roots of host but rarely do much damage.

Controls:

Cultural - Till soil.

Biological - Unknown

Chemical - Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Colorada Potato (Leptinotarsa decimlineata) beetlecoloradopotato.gif (39485 bytes) beetlecoloradopotatoeggs.gif (13691 bytes)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, (about 1/3 inch) 9 to 10 mm in length. Black striped on yellow back and black spots on orange hood. Grubs (larvae), are small red-humped with articulated legs. Eggs, orange jelly bean shape.

Life Cycle:

In the Spring, females lay hundreds of elongated orange eggs in clusters under leaves. About one week later, the grubs emerge and feed for a time and then burrow into the ground to pupate. The pupae may overwinter. There are 1 to 3 generations per year.

Hosts/Damage:

Tomato family vegetables and flowers. Adults and larvae (grubs) chew leaves and stems and may completely devour plant.

Controls:

Cultural - Plant resistant varieties. Rotate crops. Time plantings when beetles are not present. Use row covers to exclude them. Hand pick. Apply thick mulch to keep grubs from pupating. Tilling soil.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe). Bt san diego. Spined soldier bugs to destroy grubs..

Chemical - Rotenone. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Corn Flea(Chaetocnema pulicaria)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are yellow-brown with bronze tone; (about 1/10 inch) 3 mm. Thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, are whitish, slender, delicate, cyclincrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

This is a general feeder which attacks most vegetables. Larvae bore into roots and stems. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern. Bacterial wilt of corn can be spread by beetle.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Keep field debris and weed-free. Use plant covers. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


 Beetle, Corn Wireworm(Melanotus communis)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Elateridae

Description:

Adults, are click beetles; they are noted for their ability to click their bodies to flip upright when they fall on their back. Larvae, are large wireworms, with tough shiny skins.

Life Cycle:

Hosts/Damage:

Sweet potato is usual host. Larvae bore into roots and stems and are active for a year before becoming adults.

Controls:

Cultural - Cultivate garden frequently. Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles. Trap larvae with sacrificial chunks of potato; frequently check and destroy wireworms. Keep field, debris and weed free. Crop rotation sometimes helps. Plant wireworm resistant plants.

Biological - Unknown.

Chemical - Various sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Drugstore (Stegobium paniceum)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Anobiidae

Description:

Adult, brown, about 3 mm (1/8"), head bent down giving humped appearance, distinct lines or grooves on forewings.

Life Cycle: Up to 4 generations/year.

Hosts/Damage:

Larvae commonly feed on foodstuffs, pet foods, spices, dried animal products, drugs, many toxic materials and dried insects. They will even burrow through wood to get to food.

Controls:

Cultural - Keep materials in tightly sealed containers.

Biological -

Chemical - Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Eastern Field Wireworm (Limonius agonus)Eastern Field Wireworm Beetle

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Elateridae

Description:

Adults, are click beetles which black to greyish or brown with dark spots on the head and bands across the wing covers. They are noted for their ability to click their bodies to flip upright when they fall on their back. Eggs, are laid in damp soil several inches below the surface. Larvae, are brown to yellowish, large wireworms (1/3 -1/2 inch) 6 - 13 mm, with tough shiny skins.

Life Cycle:

Hosts/Damage:

Adults overwinter in soil and eggs are laid in damp soil several inches below the surface. Larvae bore into roots and stems and are active for a year before becoming adults. Bean, beet, carrot, corn, lettuce, onion, pea and potatoes are usual host for larvae.

Controls:

Cultural - Cultivate garden frequently. Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles. Trap larvae with sacrificial chunks of potato; frequently check and destroy wireworms. Keep field, debris and weed free. Crop rotation sometimes helps. Plant wireworm resistant plants.

Biological - Unknown.

Chemical - Various sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Eggplant Flea (Epitrix fuscula)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are mostly black; (about 1/10 inch) 3 mm. Thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, are whitish, slender, delicate, cylindrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

Mostly eggplant. Larvae bore into roots and stems. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Use plant covers. Keep field debris and weed-free. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Elm Leaf (Pyrrhalta luteola)beetleelmleaf.gif (32774 bytes) beetleelmleaflarvae.gif (10581 bytes) beetleelmleafeggs.gif (7367 bytes)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are (1/4 inch) 6 - 7 mm long, yellowish green with short and long black stripes on left and right wing covers. Larvae, grow to 1/2" (13 mm) before pupating; initially black which turn yellow with 2 lateral black stripes. Eggs, are yellow and found in clusters.

Life Cycle:

Adults overwinter in protected places such as buildings until Spring when they fly to elm trees to feed on new leaves. They lay onion-shaped, yellowish eggs on underside of leaves, then die. The hatched larva feed on leaves for several weeks before dropping to the ground where they pupate in debris. There are up to 5 generations per year in the South but only one in North.

Hosts/Damage:

Elm or Japanese zelkova leaves are chewed to a lace. Chewed leaves eventually turn brown and drop. Repeated defoliation may kill the tree.

Controls:

Cultural - Sticky bands on tree trunk, handpicking and keeping debris removed from under tree.

Biological - Mix fine oil to Bt san diego and spray leaves. Spined soldier bugs. Birds. Parasitic wasps.

Chemical - Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Fig(Cotinis texana)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Scarabaeidae Fig Beetle

Description:

Adults, are green or coppery with bronze wing-cover margins; (about 1/2 inch) 13 mm. Larvae, are whitish with brown head (about 2 inches) 25 mm long and comes to surface in wet weather. Eggs, are grey and oval or round.

Life Cycle:

Adults lay eggs in organic rich soil in summer. Larvae overwinter deep in soil. They pupate in early Spring and beetles move into the host plants in the Summer.

Hosts/Damage:

Adults feed on most tree fruits and berries as well as corn and other vegetables through the Summer; also chew holes in leaves. Larvae feed on roots.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Keep field debris and weed-free.

Biological - Unknown.

Chemical - Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Flatheaded Appletree Borer (Chrysobothris femorata)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Buprestidae

Description:

Adult, dark olive gray to brown with metallic luster, blunt at head end, tapering at rear, about 13 mm (1/2"). Larvae,  about 31 mm (1-1/4"), yellow white, slender with broad, flat enlargement behind head, usually lying with body curved to one side, sometimes U-shaped.

Life Cycle:

Adults emerge in May or June and hang around sunny side of trees or logs. Lay eggs in bark cracks or part of tree trunk injured. One generation/year.Winter passed as grub

Hosts/Damage:

Grubs (larvae) burrow under bark until full size, tunnels filled with feces, run 6" or more down or around trunk.Overlying bark is discolored and slightly sunken. Grubs mine inner bark, cambium, sapwood and heartwood of healthy, injuerd or dying deciduous fruit and shade trees. For example, apple, apricot, ash, mountain ash, beech, boxelder, cherry, chestnut, cottonwood, currant, dogwood, elm, hickory, horsechestnut, linden, maple, oak, peach, pear, pecan, plum, poplar, prune, sycamore, willow, raspberry, rose. Injury is worse in dry seasons, sunscalded trees and excessively pruned.

Controls:

Cultural - Keep plants healthy and don't excessively prune.

Biological -

Chemical - Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Flea (Epitris spp.)

 

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae  fleabeetl.gif (49106 bytes)

Description:

Adults, dark-brown and black; (about 1/6 inch) 3 mm, thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, white, slender, delicate, cylindrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads. Eggs, white.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

Corn, cabbage family, sweet potato and members of morning glory family. Larvae bore into roots and stems. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern. Bacterial wilt can be spread by beetle.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Keep field debris and weed-free. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Flea (Phyllotreta striolata)

 

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are yellow-brown with bronze tone; (about 1/10 inch) 3 mm. Thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, are whitish, slender, delicate, cylindrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

Corn, cabbage family, sweet potato and members of morning glory family. Larvae bore into roots and stems. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern. Bacterial wilt can be spread by beetle.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Keep field debris and weed-free. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Grape Colaspis (Colaspis brunnea)

 Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are light brown, oval beetle (1/5 inch) 5 mm long. Larvae, are whitish and plump. Eggs, are laid at the base of the host plant.

Life Cycle: One generation per year. Larvae overwinter in the soil.

Hosts/Damage:

Attack apple, bean, corn, grape, melon, potato and strawberry plants. Adults make long, curved or zigzag holes in leaves. May not do serious damage. Larvae burrow into large roots and may destroy seedlings.

Controls:

Cultural - Thorough fall tilling destroys larvae.

Biological - Unknown

Chemical - Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


 Beetle, Grape Flea (Altica chalybea)

 Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adult, is (about 1/10 inch) 2 mm long and metallic blue or green. Larvae, are very small and are yellowish with black spots.

Life Cycle: 1 or 2 generations per year. Adults overwinter in garden debris or soil.

Hosts/Damage:

Adults feed on young leaves, riddling them with shot holes. Larvae also chew on buds and leaves.

Controls:

Cultural - Till soil in fall.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Japanese (Papillia japonica)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Scarabaeidaejapanesebeetl.gif (68608 bytes)

Description:

Adults, are metallic blue or green with copper colored wing covers and about (1/2 inch) 12 mm long. Larvae, are C-shaped, greyish white with brown heads, plump and about (3/4 inch) 19 mm long. Eggs, are white and laid singly or in groups in sod.

Life Cycle:

Mature larva (grubs) overwinter in deep soil and begin moving upward in the Spring. Pupation occurs in early Summer. Adults emerge and begin feeding by mid-Summer and continue through Fall. Eggs are laid in late Summer. Life cycle covers two years.

Hosts/Damage:

Leaves, flowers and fruit of over 275 plant species including lawns. Apple, cherry, grape, peach, plum, quince, raspberry, rhubarb are examples. Vegetables are an exception. Adults skeletonize leaves, flowers and fruit are eaten. Larvae especially like lawns and other plant roots.

Controls:

Cultural - Handpick adults. Tilling to kill pupae and larvae.

Biological - Parasitize eggs with Fall tiphia wasp(Tiphia popilliavora), Spring tiphia wasp (Tiphia vernalis), tachinid flies (Hyperecteina aldrichi and Prosena siberita). Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe) and milky spore disease to kill larvae.

Chemical - Rotenone on adults. Pyrethrum on adults. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, June (Phyllophaga sp.)

Alternative Names: May, June Bugs, Daw Bugs

Order: Coleoptera  Family: Scarabaeidae

Description:

Adult: large, red brown or black, about 25 mm (1"), about 200 species, fly at night and attracted to lights, often try to enter houses. Hide in grass or debris during daytime. Larvae (grubs) look like Japanese beetle grubs but larger, 13 - 37 mm (1/2 - 1-1/2"), white, spines underneath in shape of elongated diamond.

Life Cycle:

Females burrow into soil to lay their eggs. Lay eggs in soil ball several inches below surface of sod. eggs hatch in 2 - 3 weeks. Grubs (larvae) feed until Fall. Grubs come up to feed in Spring prior to forming pupae, the adult is formed the following Spring. Adults appear about May - July

Hosts/Damage:

Adults feed on leaves of ash, birch, butternut, elm, hickory, poplar, oaks, tuliptree, willow and other ornamentals. Most prefer hardwood but some southern species feed on pine, cypress and roses.

Control:

Cultural - Till soil in Fall. Don't plant susceptible crops for at least on year after field plowed from sod.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Various pesticides are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Klamathweed (Chryolina quadrigemina)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description: Unknown

Life Cycle: Unknown

Hosts/Damage: Beneficial . Eats Klamath weed.

Controls:

Cultural - None

Biological - None

Chemical - None


Beetle, Margined Blister (Epicauta pestifera)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Meloidae

Description:

Adult, is black with narrow gray margin around each wing cover with soft elongated body, long legs and narrow neck. About 13 mm long. Immature, varies from white grub like larva to adult like appearance. Eggs, are cylindrical.

Life Cycle:

One generation per year. Insect overwinters as immature in tunnels in the soil where the eggs are laid and hatched.

Hosts/Damage:

Adults feed on many garden vegetables. Immatures feed on grasshopper eggs so they are beneficial.

Controls:

Cultural - Handpick with gloves to avoid blistering secretion from adults. Till soil to discourage immatures.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae.

Chemical - Rotenone. Pyrethrum. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Mexican Bean (Epilachna varivestas)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Coccinellidae

Description:

Adults, are yellow to coppery-brown colored with 16 black spots and resemble ladybugs. Larvae, are (1/3 inch) 8 to 9 mm long and are yellow with 6 rows of long black-tipped spines along their back. Eggs, are yellow-orange and about 1/20" (2 mm); they are found in clusters of 40 or more under host leaves. Pupae, is smooth, yellow-orange, round in front and attached under host leaves.

Life Cycle:

Adults feed, mate and lay clusters of eggs under host leaves in Spring over a 2 week period. Eggs hatch within 2 weeks and larvae feed before pupating attached to leaves. There are up to 4 generations per year. Adults overwinter in wooded areas or in garden debris.

Hosts/Damage:

Adults and larvae feed on cowpeas, soybean, clover, alfalfa, bean leaves and beans and pods (leaves are chewed to a lace). Heavily infested plants usually die. Damage is most severe in July and August.

Controls:

Cultural - Row covers keep adults out. Keep garden debris removed. Handpick adults. Traps. Early or fall planting.

Biological - Bean beetle parasites. Spined soldier bugs.

Chemical - Neem. Rotenone. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Northern Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica barberi)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidaenorthcornrootwrmbeetl.gif (33515 bytes)

Description:

Adult, is yellow, pale green or brownish red beetles with long antenna. Some may have black spots or stripes. Larvae, are brown headed white worms (1/2 - 2/3 inch) 12 to 18 mm long.

Life Cycle:

Up to 3 generations per year. The adult females lay orange yellow eggs at the base of corn plants. The young larvae that hatch feed on corn roots for several weeks before pupating in the soil in late July or August. Corn planted after several years of planting a given area, late planted corn and corn under drought stress are most susceptible to attack.

Hosts/Damage:

Adults feed on pollen, silks and tassels of corn which results in deformed ears and undeveloped kernels. They may also feed on leaves. The larvae feed on corn roots.

Controls:

Cultural - Till soil to kill eggs and larvae. Handpick adults. Rotate corn crop to another area every 2 years.

Biological - Parasitic insects attack eggs and larvae.

Chemical - Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Obscure Root  Weevil (Otiorhynchus spp.)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Curculionidae

Description: Adult, gray brown with a dark, white-bordered irregular band on wing covers.

Life Cycle: Typical beetle.

Hosts/Damage:

Adult feeds on rhododendron, azalea, vibernum, camellia, rose, yew, etc. Larvae feed on roots. Also a problem on small fruit plants.

Controls:

Cultural - zzz

Mechanical - Use sticky material as barrier on plant stem.

Biological - zzz

Chemical - Check nursery or hardware store for pesticides. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Potato Flea (Epitrix cucumeris)

 

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are mostly black; (about 1/10 inch) 3 mm. Thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, are whitish, slender, delicate, cyclincrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

Potato, tobacco, tomato, pepper, horsenettle and related weeds. Larvae bore into roots and stems and cause substantial damage. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern..

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Use plant covers. Keep field debris and weed-free. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Quince Curculio Weevil (Conotrachelus crataegi)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Curculionidae

Description: Adult, broad, gray brown. Larvae (Grubs), white, legless.

Life Cycle:

Adults lay eggs in fruit. Grubs feed in fruit during the summer but drop to ground before fruit falls. Grub overwinters in soil.

Hosts/Damage: Adults eat irregular cavities in Quince.

Controls:

Cultural - None

Biological - ?

Chemical - ? Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Rose Chafer (Macrodactylus subspinosus)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Scarabaeidae

Description:

Adults, are about (1/2 inch) 12 mm long; long legged, slender and light tan color. Larvae, are about (2/3 inch) 18 mm long, white and slim.

Life Cycle:

Adults emerge in Spring from the pupae stage and feed for a few weeks before laying eggs in sandy soil. The larvae emerge and feed in sandly soil near the surface and then tunnel deeper during the winter to pupate. There is one generation per year.

Hosts/Damage:

Adults feed on many flowers including roses and peonies; leaves are chewed to a lace and they eat holes in flowers. Some fruits and vegetables are also attacked. Larvae attack lawns and roots of other hosts.

Controls:

Cultural - Row covers to exclude adults. Handpick adults. White sticky traps to catch adults. Till soil to kill larvae and pupae.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone and pyrethrum spray adults. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Roundheaded Appletree Borer (Saperda candida)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Cerambycidae

Description:

Adults, about 25 mm (1") long, yellow or red brown above, white underneath, 2 white stripes the length of body and prominent gray antennae. Larvae (Grubs), initially brown red turning to creamy white, rounded thickening behind head.

Range: Eastern U.S.

Life Cycle:

Females lay eggs on trunks, usually not more than 2 - 3 ft above ground in May - August depending on how far North. See below for details.

Hosts/Damage:

Young apple, pear, quince, peach and cherry trees may be killed the first year. Older trees may last 2 -3 years before being blown over due to weakening of the trunk. Grub begins with bark producing brown sap stains, then tunnels into sapwood for a year or two, ejecting conspicuous coils of rusty brown feces. The next season it bores into the heartwood, tunneling outward in Fall to prepare a Winter chamber near bark. the grub pupates here in May and the beetle emerges May - July. Adult feeds somewhat on leaves and fruit.

Controls:

Cultural - Handpick adults. White sticky traps to catch adults. Till soil to kill larvae and pupae.

Biological - ?

Chemical - Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Sap (Nitidula sp.)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Nitidulidae


Beetle, Shothole Borer (Scolytus rugulosus)

TBD


Beetle, Southern Potato Wireworm (Conoderus falli)

TBD


Beetle, Spotted Asparagus (Crioceris duodecimpunctata)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adult, is red or light brown with 12 black spots on wing covers, shiny, smooth and about (1/3 inch) 8 mm long. Larva, is orange with black head and legs, plump and about (1/3 inch) 8 mm long. Eggs, are dark brown to green.

Life Cycle: Up to 2 generations per year. Eggs are laid under host leaves.

Hosts/Damage: Adults feed on asparagus spears and leaves in early Summer. Larvae do little damage.

Controls:

Cultural - Row covers exclude adults. Handpick adults. Remove debris to expose eggs and larvae to predators.

Biological - Chalcid wasps parasitize eggs. Spined soldier bugs attack larvae..

Chemical - Rotenone kills adults and larvae. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Spotted Cucumber (Diabrotica undecimpunctata)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae Spotted Cucumber Beetle

Description:

Adults, are yellowish-green with 12 black spots, (1/4 inch) 6 mm long. The head, legs and antennae are black. Beaded antennae are about 1/16" (2 mm) long. Larvae, slim, yellow-white with wrinkled body are dark at both ends and are 1/2 - 3/4" (13 - 19 mm) long. It has 6 long, brown colored legs. Pupae, are white to yellow and about 1/4" (6 mm) long. Eggs, are oval, orange-yellow and found in clusters of 25 - 50 under host leaves.

Life Cycle:

Adults overwinter in the plant debris. Adults leave their winter sites in late March and adults lay eggs beneath host plants in Spring, from late April to early June. Before cucurbits are available they eat leaves and stems. Larvae burrow into soil at base of host and chew on roots for about 1 month before pupating. There are 1 to 4 generations per year and a complete life cycle takes 6 - 9 weeks..

Hosts/Damage:

Adults attack cucumbers, corn, cantaloupes, winter and summer squash, pumpkins, gourds, watermelon, beans, peas, potato, beet, tomato, eggplant and cabbage. They feed on young seedlings causing poor stands and reduced yield. They chew leaves and tender shoots and may girdle the stem. They feed on flowers and gnaw holes in fruit. Adults harbor the bacterial wilt organism (Pseudomonas lachrymans) which they transmit to their host. They also spread cucumber mosaic. The larvae is the southern corn rootworm.

Range: Mexico to Canada but are most abundant and destructive in the warmer climates.

Controls:

Cultural - Plant host resistant varieties. Row covers to exclude adults. Handpick adults. It is vital to eliminate adults early before they have spread diseases to the various host plants. Till field early and remove garden debris. Delay planting.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe). Tachnid fly (Celatoria diabrotica) to parasitize eggs.

Chemical - Sabadilla or rotenone and pyrethrum to kill adults. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Spotted Grapevine (Pelidnota punctata)

TBD


Beetle, Striped Blister (Epicauta vittata)

Striped Blister Beetle

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Meloidae

Description:

Adults, (1/2 - 2/3 inch) 13 to 17 mm long. Yellow and black alternating stripes on back. Middle part of body is noticeably smaller than head.

Life Cycle: Adults lay eggs under soil. Larvae feed on grasshopper eggs until they pupate to adult beetles.

Hosts/Damage:

Larvae feed on grasshopper eggs in the soil so are beneficial in that stage. Adults feed on many weeds, flowers and vegetables, especially those in the tomato family.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand picking (Use gloves to avoid painful skin blisters). Tilling soil.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae .

Chemical - Rotenone and pyrethrum. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Striped Cucumber (Acalymma vitatum)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are yellowish with 3 black stripes, up to (3/16 inch) 5 mm long. The head, legs and antennae are black. Beaded antennae are about 1/16" (2 mm) long. Larvae, slim, yellow-white with wrinkled body are dark at both ends and are 1/2 - 3/4" (13 - 19 mm) long. It has 6 long, brown colored legs. Pupae, are white to yellow and about 1/4" (6 mm) long. Eggs, are oval, orange-yellow and found in clusters of 25 - 50 under host leaves.

Life Cycle:

Adults overwinter in the plant debris. Adults leave their winter sites in late March and adults lay eggs beneath host plants in Spring, from late April to early June. Before cucurbits are available they eat leaves and stems. Larvae burrow into soil at base of host and chew on roots for about 1 month before pupating. There are 1 to 4 generations per year and a complete life cycle takes 6 - 9 weeks..

Hosts/Damage:

Adults attack cucumbers, corn, cantaloupes, winter and summer squash, pumpkins, gourds, watermelon, beans and peas. They feed on young seedlings causing poor stands and reduced yield. They chew leaves and tender shoots and may girdle the stem. They feed on flowers and gnaw holes in fruit. Adults harbor the bacterial wilt organism (Pseudomonas lachrymans) which they transmit to their host. They also spread cucumber mosaic.

Range: Mexico to Canada but are most abundant and destructive in the warmer climates.

Controls:

Cultural - Plant resistant varieties. Use row covers. Hand pick. Till field early and remove garden debris. Delay planting.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Striped Flea (Phyllotreta striolata)

 

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, have a crooked, yellowish strip on each wing cover; (about 1/2 inch) 13 mm long. Thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, are whitish, slender, delicate, cyclincrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

Cabbage family. Larvae bore into roots and stems. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Use plant covers. Keep field debris and weed-free. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Sweetpotato Flea (Chaetocnema confinis)

 

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are yellow-brown with bronze tone; (about 1/10 inch) 3 mm. Thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, are whitish, slender, delicate, cyclincrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

Corn, cabbage family, sweet potato and members of morning glory family. Larvae bore into roots and stems and can cause heavy losses. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Use plant covers. Keep field debris and weed-free. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Tobacco Flea (Epitrix hirtipennis)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: Chrysomelidae

Description:

Adults, are yellow-brown with dark band across the wings; (about 1/10 inch) 3 mm. Thickened hind legs enable them to jump. Larvae, are whitish, slender, delicate, cyclincrical worms from (1/8 - 1/3 inch) 3 - 8 mm long with small legs and brownish heads.

Life Cycle:

Adults usually overwinter in garden debris and nearby weeds.They move into the host plants in the Spring and feed especially on young plants. The adults lay eggs scattered under host plants. Eggs hatch in about 10 days and feed on roots for 3 or 4 weeks. Pupae usually stay in soil for about 10 days before adults emerge to feed on leaves.

Hosts/Damage:

Potato, tobacco, tomato, pepper, horsenettle and related weeds. Larvae bore into roots and stems. Adults feed on leaves through the Summer. Leaves are eaten in shot-hole pattern.

Controls:

Cultural - Hand pick and destroy larvae and adult beetles.Keep field debris and weed-free. Late planting helps.

Biological - Parasitic nematodes attack larvae and pupae (e.g. Biosafe).

Chemical - Rotenone or pyrethrum will control but usually not necessary. Various other sprays and baits are available at your nursery or hardware store. Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Tobacco Wireworm (Conderus vespertinus)

TBD


Beetle, Varied Carpet (Anthrenus verbasci)

Order: Coleoptera; Family: zzz

Description: zzz

Life Cycle: zzz

Hosts/Damage: zzz

Controls:

Cultural - zzz

Biological - zzz

Chemical - zzz Follow label instructions carefully to avoid injury to your plant, yourself, your pets or the environment.


Beetle, Whitefringed (Graphognathus leucoloma)

TBD


 Last edited: 11/24/98 02:19 AM

 

Disclaimer:

The help provided by the author of this site is the best scientific based information, about which he is aware, but gardening is not an exact science due to the many unpredictable elements involved so the results can not be guaranteed. E-mail feedback is therefor invited to keep the author aware of successes and failures. Also let me know if you are the author of anything that appears to be illegally incorporated in violation of your copyrights.