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Insect Website Title

Insect Classification: (Phylum, Class, Order, Family)

(and related animals)


Annelida (Earthworms)

 

Arthropoda

Arachnida

Acarina (Mites and Ticks)

(Ref.: National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects & Spiders, L. & M. Milne, 1980, ISBN 0-394-50763-0)

Argasidae - Soft tick

Hydrachnellae - Water mite

Ioxdidae - Hard tick

Tetranychidae - Spider mite

Trombidiidae - Velvet mite

Amblypygi (Tailless Whipscorpions)

(Ref.: National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects & Spiders, L. & M. Milne, 1980, ISBN 0-394-50763-0)

Tarantulidae -

Araneae (Spiders)

(Ref.: The Spiders, B.J. Kaston, 2nd Edit., 1972, ISBN 0-697-04875-6)

Acanthoctendia -

Actinopodidae -

Agelenidae - Funnel-web weaver spider

Amaurobiidae -

Amaurobioididae -

Ammoxenidae -

Antrodiaetidae - Folding-door, trap-door spider

Anyphaenidae -

Aphantochilidae -

Araneidae - Orbweaver spider

Archaeidae -

Argyronetidae - Pond water spider

Atypidae - Purse web weaver spider

Barychelidae -

Caponiidae -

Cithaeronidae -

Clubionidae - Foliage spider

Ctenidae -

Ctenizidae - Trapdoor spider

Desidae - Marine spider

Dictynidae -

Diguetidae -

Dinopidae - Ogre spider

Dipluridae - Sheet or funnel-web tarantula

Dysderidae -

Eresidae -

Filistatidae -

Gnaphosidae - Ground spider

Gradungulidae -

Hadrotarsidae -

Hahniidae -

Hersiliidae -

Homalonychidae -

Hypochilidae -

Leptonetidae -

Linyphiidae - Line weaver spider

Liphistiidae -

Loxoscelidae - (Includes Brown recluse or violin spider)

Lycosidae - Wolf spider

Lyssomanidae -

Mecicobothriidae - Sheet-web weaving spider

Micryphantidae - Dwarf spider

Migidae -

Mimetidae - Pirate spider

Nesticidae -

Ochyroceratidae -

Oecibiidae -

Oonopidae -

Oxyopidae - Lynx spider

Palpimanidae -

Paratropididae -

Pholcidae - Cellar spider

Pisauridae - Nursery-web spider

Platoridae -

Plectreuridae -

Prodidomidae -

Psechridae -

Pycnothelidae -

Salticidae - Jumping spider

Scytodidae - Spitting spider

Segesttriidae -

Selenopidae -

Senoculidae -

Sicariidae -

Sparassidae - Giant crab spider

Symphytognathidae -

Telemidae -

Tengellidae -

Tetrablemmidae -

Tetragnathidae - Long-jawed orbweaver

Theraphosidae - Tarantulas

Theridiidae - Comb-footed spider (includes Black Widow)

Theridiosomatidae - Ray spider

Thomisidae - Crab spider

Toxopidae -

Uloboridae -

Urocteidae -

Zodariidae -

Zoridae -

Zoropsidae -

Opiliones (Daddy-long-legs)

(Ref.: National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects & Spiders, L. & M. Milne, 1980, ISBN 0-394-50763-0)

Phalangiidae -

Pseudoscorpionida (Pseudoscorpions)

(Ref.: National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects & Spiders, L. & M. Milne, 1980, ISBN 0-394-50763-0)

Chernetidae -

Scorpionida (Scorpions)

(Ref.: National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects & Spiders, L. & M. Milne, 1980, ISBN 0-394-50763-0)

Buthidae - Buthid

Iuridae - Iurid

Solpugida (Windscorpions)

(Ref.: National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects & Spiders, L. & M. Milne, 1980, ISBN 0-394-50763-0)

Eremobatidae -

Uropygi (Whipscorpions)

(Ref.: National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects & Spiders, L. & M. Milne, 1980, ISBN 0-394-50763-0)

Thelyphonidae - Vinegarones

Chilopoda

Centipede - Fast moving; one pair of legs per body segment; flat body; long antenna; poisonous claws; breathe through spiracles like insects.

Symphyla - White; flat; 10-20 legs; long antenna w/14 or more segments; very small.

Crustacea

Pillbug - Can roll up into ball; breathe through gills.

Sowbug - Two, small pointy tails; breathe through gills.

 

Diplopoda

Millipedes - Slow moving; Two pair of legs per most body segments (have 30 - 400 legs); some emit smelly, brownish, irritating fluid; short antenna usually w/ 7 segments.

Insecta

Anoplura (Sucking Lice; "unarmed, without a tail")

No life cycle; sucking mouth; flat body; large claw for grasping hosts hair or feathers; narrow head; parasitic pest.

Echinophthiriidae - Spiny sucking lice - Body thickly covered with short, stout spines. Parasite on marine mammals, i.e. seals, sea lions and walruses.

Haematopinidae - Hog louse - Attack mammals other than man or primates.

Pediculidae - Human louse - Parasites of man. Phthirus pubis (crab louse) is usually found on hairy parts such as pubic area. Phthirus humanis (Head and body louse) is found in the hair or on the body and clothing.

Coleoptera (Beetle & Weevil; "sheath wings")

Complete life cycle; chewing mouth; armor-like wing covers meet in straight line down back; some pests, some beneficial.

Alleculidae - Comb-clawed beetle - 177 species, 118 in West. 4 - 15 mm. Antennae threadlike, sawtoothed. Found in dead bark, vegetation and flowers.

Amphizoidae - Trout-stream beetle - 4 species, mountains in West. Elongated, oval, convex on back but flat underneath. Antennae threadlike. Dull brown to black. 11 - 16 mm. Aquatic and found in far West streams. Adults and larvae live in icy waters of swift mountain streams. Cling to debris or stones in eddies. One species lives in relatively warm water in streams near Seattle, Washington. Poor swimmers. Adults and larvae are predaceous.

Anobiidae - Death-watch beetle - 310 species, many in West. 1.1 - 9 mm. Antennae clubbed, sawtoothed. Found with foliage, wood and fungi.

Anthicidae - Antlike flower beetle - 140 species, 93 in West. 1.7 - 4.3 mm. Antennae threadlike. Found on ground and foliage.

Anthribidae - Fungus weevil - 81 species. .8 - 15 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with fungi and foliage.

Biphyllidae - Biphyllid beetle - 4 species, in East and Southwest. 2 - 3.5 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with fungi and under bark.

Bostrichidae - Branch & twig borer - 60 species, most in Southwest. 2 - 52 mm. Antennae clubbed. Attracted to light and with fungi.

Brachypsectridae - Texas beetle - 1 specie, Texas to California. 4.6 6 mm. Antennae sawtoothed. Found under bark.

Brathinidae - Grass-root beetle - 3 species, in Northeast and California. Elongated and slender, long-legged, ant-like. Antennae threadlike. Back smooth and shiny. 3.4 - 6 mm. Only 2 species found in the East and 1 in California. They are found in grass roots near water. They are very rare.

Brentidae - Primitive weevil - 6 species, in East, Texas and California. 5.2 - 42 mm. Antennae beadlike. Found under bark or in wood.

Bruchidae - Seed beetle - 107 species, thoughout North America. 1- 8 mm. Antennae sawtoothed, clubbed. Found with foliage, flowers and seeds.

Buprestidae - Metallic Wood-boring beetle - 718 species, thoughout North America, many in West. 2 - 40 mm. Antennae sawtoothed, threadlike. Found with foliage, trees, flowers.

Byrrhidae - Pill beetle - 42 species, throughout North America, many in West. 1.5 - 10 mm. Antennae clubbed, threadlike. Found with foliage or on ground.

Byturidae - Fruitworm beetle - 5 species, throughout North America. 2.7 - 4.4 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with foliage of berry plants.

Cantharidae - Soldier beetle - 455 species, throughout North America. 1 - 15 mm. Antennae threadlike, sawtoothed. Found with foliage or flowers.

Carabidae - Ground beetle - 1700 species, throughout North America. Antennae threadlike. Legs usually long and slender, usually black and shiny or dark but sometimes brightly iridescent colors such as purple or dark green. 1.2 - 35 mm. Common on ground under plants or debris in the garden. Attracted to light and most are nocturnal. They run rapidly and seldom fly. Larvae found in similar situations. Genus Calosoma are called caterpillar hunters. Genus Brachinus are called bombardier beetles because they eject a foul-smelling substance, with a loud sound, to discourage their enemies such as birds.

Cebrionidae - Cebrionid beetle - 17 species, found Southeast to Southwest. 13.5 - 25 mm. Antennae sawtoothed. Found under dead bark, ground or with foliage.

Cephaloidae - False long-horned beetle - 10 species, East and West. 8 - 20 mm. Antennae threadlike. Found with flowers or foliage.

Cerambycidae - Long-horned beetle - 1100 species, throughout North America. 2 - 60 mm. Antennae threadlike, very long. Found with foliage, flowers or wood.

Cerophytidae - Rare click beetle - 2 species, East and California. 5.5 - 8.5 mm. Antennae comblike, sawtoothed. Found with bark, foliage or wood.

Cerylonidae - Cerylonid beetle - 18 species, throughout North America. 1.2 - 3 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with dead bark or ant nests.

Chelonariidae - Chelonariid beetle - 1 specie, Southeast and Arkansas. 6.5 - 7.2 mm. Antennae sawtoothed. Found with foliage.

Chrysomelidae - Leaf beetle - 1474 species, throughout North America. 1 - 16 mm. Antennae, threadlike, clubbed. Found usually on weed foliage.

Cicindelidae - Tiger beetle - 130 species, throughout North America. Long threadlike antenna, segmented, legs long and slender, brown, black or green, often patterned, some iridescent and colorful. 6 - 40 mm. Very fast-running and flying. Occur in sunlit open areas on sandy beaches or paths. Strong mandibles make them good predators. They can pinch hard! The larvae make vertical tunnels like antlions where they capture their prey. About 100 of the 130 are in the genus Cicindela.

Ciidae - Minute tree-fungus beetle - 85 species, throughout North America but many in South east. .5 - 6 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found mostly on polypore fungi.

Clambidae - Minute beetle - 8 species, throughout North America. .8 - 1 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with rotting plants or ant nests.

Cleridae - Checkered beetle - 261 species, throughout North America, many in Southwest. 1.8 - 24 mm. Antenna variable. Found with foliage, flowers or wood.

Coccinellidae - Ladybug beetle - 400 species, throughout North America. .8 - 10 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found on foliage.

Colydiidae - Cylindrical bark beetle - 92 species, throughout North America. 1.7 - 13 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found under dead bark.

Corylophidae - Minute fungus beetle - 61 species, throughout North America but 40 in East. .5 - 2.2 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with rotting plants or on foliage.

Cryptophagidae - Silken fungus beetle - 166 species, throughout North America. .8 - 5 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with fungi or decaying vegetation.

Cucujidae - Flat bark beetle - 88 species, throughout North America. 1.3 - 14 mm. Antennae beadlike, threadlike. Found with bark or decaying vegetation.

Cupedidae - Reticulated beetle - Long body, fairly flat, body clothed with broad scales, antenna long, thead-like about 1/2 length of body. 7 - 20 mm. 5 species, found in East and West.. Adults found in logs, where larvae occur or flying in sunlight. Larvae bore into rotting oak, chestnut and pine.

Curculionidae - Weevil - 2,432 species, found throughout North America. .6 - 35 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with foliage.

Dascillidae - Soft-bodied plant beetle - 16 species, found throughout North America but most in West. Antennae threadlike and sawtoothed. Found with foliage in moist areas.

Dermestidae - Dermestid beetle - 123 species, found throughout North America. 1 - 12 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with flowers, carcasses, foodstuff indoors.

Derodontidae - Tooth-necked fungus beetle - 9 species, found in Northeast and West. 2 - 6 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with dead bark, shelf fungi or foliage.

Dryopidae - Long-toed water beetle - 15 species, found throughout North America but many in West. 4 - 8 mm. Antennae comblike. Found in streams and attracted to lights.

Dytiscidae - Predaceous diving beetle - 476 species, found throughout North America. 1.2 - 40 mm. antennae threadlike. Elongated, oval, convex, streamlined. Hind legs flattened and fringed with hairs with 1 or 2 claws. Antennae threadlike and curved back. Black, brown or yellow, often with light markings. 1.4 - 35 mm. Abundant in ponds, lakes and streams and are excellent swimmers. Move hind legs in unison unlike water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae). They are attracted by and fly to lights. Adults and larvae are predators.

Elateridae - Click beetle - 800 species, found throughout North America. 1.5 - 45 mm. Antennae sawtoothed. Found with foliage, bark or rotting wood.

Elmidae - Riffle beetle - 93 species, found throughout North America. 1 - 8 mm. Antennae threadlike and clubbed. Found in streams and lakes and is attracted to lights.

Endomychidae - Handsome fungus beetle -35 species, found throughout North America but aboutd 22 in East. 1 - 10 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with fungi, rotten wood or decaying fruit.

Erotylidae - Pleasing fungus beetle - 50 species, found throughout North America but about 33 in East. 2.5 - 22 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found with fungi.

Eucinetidae - Eucinetid beetle - 8 species, found most in East but some in California. 2.5 - 4 mm. Antennae threadlike. Found with dead bark, rotting wood or fungi.

Eucnemidae - False click beetle - 67 species, found throughout North America but most in East. 2 -18 mm. Antennae sawtoothed and threadlike. Found with dead bark or foliage.

Euglenidae - Antlike leaf beetle - 39 species, found throughout North America but about 26 in East. 1.5 - 3 mm. Antennae threadlike and clubbed. Found with foliage or flowers.

Georyssidae - Minute mud-loving beetle - 2 species found in Nebraska and California. 1.5 - 3 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found at stream shores.

Gyrinidae - Whirligig beetle - 51 species, throughout North America but most in East. Elongated, oval with taper similar in front and rear and flattened. Antennae clubbed and short. 3 - 15.5 mm. Black or rarely dark, metallic green. Front legs long and slender with elbow. Rear legs very short and flattened. Antennae very short and clubbed. Often seen swimming in groups in a gyrating fashion on the surface of ponds and streams. They are good and rapid swimmers. Adults and larvae are predators. Some adults give off an odor similar to pineapples when handled.

Haliplidae - Crawling water beetle - 60 species, found throughout North America and many in East. Oval, tapering at end, convex. 1.7 - 4.5 mm. Yellow or brownish with black spots. Head small. Antennae threadlike and short. Not good swimmers but found around ponds and streams and lakes. They are usually creeping over submerged vegetation.

Helodidae - Marsh beetle - 34 species, found throughout North America but most in East. 2 - 5 mm. Antennae threadlike. Found with foliage in marshy areas.

Heteroceridae - Variegated mud-loving beetle - 28 species, found throughout North America. 1 - 8 mm. Antennae sawtoothed and short. Found near stream and pond shores and attracted to lights.

Histeridae - Hister beetle - 359 species, found throughout North America. Antennae elbowed, clubbed. Body usually oval, sometimes flattened or elongated and cylindrical. Hard bodied and shiny black sometimes with red markings. .5 - 20 mm. Predators of insects that are attracted to decaying organic matter and oozing sap. Flat species live under loose bark and cylindrical species live in the galleries of wood-boring insects.

Hydraenidae - Minute moss beetle - 33 species, found throughout North America but most in West. 1.2 - 2.5 mm. Antennae clubbed. Found near stream, lake and pond shores.

Hydrophilidae - Water-scavenger beetle - 225 species, found throughout North America. Body generally oval or elliptical, 5 abdominal segments, convex back, antennae short and clubbed. Hind legs flattened, usually with fringed hair. Black, brown or yellow, sometimes patterned. 1 - 40 mm. Similar to Predaceous Diving beetle (Dytiscidae), most are aquatic both as adults and larvae. Adults are usually scavengers but larvae feed on a variety of aquatic animals. 1 genus is terrestrial and feed in dung, humus and decaying leaves.

Hydroscaphidae - Skiff beetle - Similar to Rove beetle (Staphylinidae), oval body, tan to brown, antennae threadlike. 1 - 1.5 mm. 1 species found in Arizona, Southern Nevada and Southern California. Adult and larvae found in streams on filamentous algae growing on rocks, especially in shallow water.

Lagriidae - Long-jointed bark beetle - 21 species, found throughout North America. Antennae threadlike. 6 - 15 mm. Found with foliage or dead bark.

Lampyridae - Firefly beetle - 136 species, found throughout North America but many in East. Antennae threadlike and toothed. 4.5 - 20 mm. Found with foliage, flying at night or on the ground.

Languridae - Lizard beetle - 17 species, found throughout North America but many in South. Antennae clubbed. 3 - 16 mm. Found with foliage or flowers.

Lathridiidae - Minute brown scavenger beetle - 108 species, found throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. 1 - 3 mm. Found with moldy plant and animal matter.

Leiodidae - Round fungus beetle - 126 species, found throughout North America. Oval to nearly spherical, very convex, often capable of rolling into a ball. Shiny black or brown. Antennae clubbed and curved back. 1 - 6.5 mm. They are found under the bark of dead trees, in rotten wood, decaying vegetation and rotting fungi. Many species roll into a ball and play dead when disturbed.

Leptinidae - Mammal-nest beetle - Brownish, oval, flattened. Eyes reduced or none. Antennae clubbed. Forewing has dense, fine golden hairs. 2 - 5 mm. 4 species in North America found in nests and fur of mice, shrews, moles and beavers. 1 species also found in nests of social Hymenoptera found throughout North America. They probably feed on eggs and young of mites and other small insect related animals.

Leptodiridae - Small carrion beetle - 81 species, found throughout North America. Elongated and oval, head partially visible from back, antennae clubbed and curved back, 8th segment much smaller than 7th or 9th. Body covered with fairly dense flattened fine hairs. 1.7 - 6 mm.Common members feed on carrion. Others are found in fungi, ant nests or are associated with mammals as scavengers.

Limnichidae - Minute marsh-loving beetle - 32 species, found throughout North America. Antennae sawtoothed and clubbed. .7 - 2.5 mm. Found in streams or along edges.

Limnebiidae (See Hydraenidae)

Limulodidae - Horseshoe crab beetle - Covered with fine hairs and shaped like a horseshoe crab. Antennae are clubbed. Eyes reduced or absent. .7 - .9 mm. 4 species associated with ants found from East to Arizona. They feed on substances exuded by ants.

Lucanidae - Stag beetle - 30 species found throughout North America, 20 in West. Antennae comblike. 8 - 60 mm. Found with logs, stumps, on the ground and is attracted to lights.

Lycidae - Net-Winged beetle - 78 species found throughout North America but most in West. Antennae threadlike and sawtoothed. 3 - 19 mm. Found with foliage, flowers or tree trunks.

Lyctidae - Powder post beetle - 11 species found throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. 1 - 7 mm. Found with seasoned wood.

Lymexylonidae - Ship-timber beetle - 1 species found throughout North America but 2 rare species are found in Eastern states.. Body narrow, elongated. 9 - 13.5 mm. Antennae are short and 11 segmented. They are found in decaying wood and under bark. Larvae bore into heart and sapwood of dead chestnut, poplar and other trees.

Melandryidae - False darkling beetle - 95 species found throughout North America but most found in East. Antenna threadlike and clubbed. 2 - 20 mm. Found with bark, foliage, fungi and flowers.

Meloidae - Blister beetle - 335 species found throughout North America but most in West. Antennae threadlike or beadlike. 3 - 30 mm. Found with foliage and flowers. Many are pests. Exude liquid which can cause blisters on ones skin.

Melyridae - Soft-winged flower beetle - 502 species found throughout North America but many are found in West. Antennae threadlike and toothed. 1.5 - 7 mm. Found with foliage and flowers.

Micromalthidae - Micromalthid beetle - Resemble small soldier beetles, antenna short, beadlike, 11 segments. 1.5 - 2.5 mm. 1 species, Micromalthus debilis, found in East. Found in rotten oak and chestnut in the Northeast.

Monommidae - Monommid beetle - 5 species found in Southeast to Southwest U.S. Antennae clubbed. 5 - 12 mm. Found with foliage and debris.

Mordellidae - Tumbling flower beetle - 204 species found throughout North America. Antennae threadlike and sawtoothed. 1.5 - 15 mm. Found with flowers and foliage.

Mycetophagidae - Hairy fungus beetle - 26 species throughout North America but about 17 found in East. Antennae clubbed. 1 - 6.3 mm. Found with fungi or humus.

Nitidulidae - Sap beetle - 177 species throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. 1 - 12 mm. Found with rotting fruit, fungi, flowers and flowing sap.

Nosodendridae - Wounded-tree beetle - 2 species, found in Northeast and Pacific coast. Antennae clubbed. 4 - 6 mm. Found where there is an oozing tree wound.

Noteridae - Burrowing water beetle - Similar to Predaceous Diving beetle (Dytiscidae) but antennae threadlike and curved forward and oval body more pointed toward rear. Black to re-brown. 1.2 - 5.5 mm. 17 species. Most common in Southeastern states but a few occur in Northeastern states and found out to Texas. Larvae burrow into mud near roots of aquatic plants.

Oedemeridae - False blister beetle - 53 species found throughout North America. Antennae threadlike and slightly toothed. 5 - 23 mm. Found with decaying wood, foliage or flowers.

Omophronidae - Round sand beetle (Under Carabidae) - Oval, some taper on each end, convex, large head, Brown or black with light markings. 5 - 8 mm. Found in mud or sand along stream or lake shores. Larvae and adults are predators.

Othniidae - False tiger beetle - 5 species found in Virginia and Nebraska to California. Antennae clubbed. 5 - 9 mm. Found with humus, bark or cacti.

Passalidae - Bessbug beetle - 3 species found in East and Texas. Antennae clubbed. 28 - 40 mm. Found with logs or stumps.

Pedilidae - Pedilid beetle - 57 species found throughout North America but mostly in West. Antennae threadlike and sawtoothed. 4 - 15 mm. Found with flowers or foliage.

Perothopidae - Perothopid beetle - 3 species found in East and California. Antennae threadlike. 10 - 25 mm. Found with beech, apple or oak trees.

Phalacridae - Shining mold beetle - 122 species found throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. 1- 3 mm. Found with flowers, foliage or under bark.

Phengodidae - Glowworms - 25 species found in East and West. Antennae featherlike. 4.5 - 20 mm. Found attracted to lights.

Platypodidae - Pinhole borers - 7 species throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. 2 - 8 mm. Found with wood and attracted to lights.

Platypsyllidae - Beaver parasite beetle (Under Leptinidae) - Body elongated, oval and flattened. Eyes and hind wing absent. Antennae 11 segmented, not clubbed. About 2.5 mm. 1 species (Platypsyllus castoris) is an ectoparasite (lives outside of host) of the American Beaver, adults and larvae spend most of their life on host.

Pselaphidae - Short-winged mold beetle - 500 species throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. .5 - 5.5 mm. Found with bark, under debris, in tree holes and nests.

Psephenidae - Water-penny beetle - 13 species found in North East but mostly in West. Antennae threadlike and sawtoothed. 3 - 7 mm. Found in or near streams.

Ptiliidae - Feather-winged beetle - 111 species throughout North America but most in East. Antennae clubbed, each segment with a whorl of long hair. Hind wing with a fringe of long hair. Oval and often has fine hair. .25 - 1.5 mm. Some members are the smallest beetles known and among the smallest insects. Found in rotting wood, fungus-covered logs, vegetable debris and dung. They feed mostly on fungus spores.

Ptilodactylidae - Ptilodactylid beetle - 10 species found in East onto to Arizona. Antennae comblike and sawtoothed. 4 - 10 mm. Found with foliage.

Ptinidae - Spider beetle - 50 species throughout North America but many in South West. Antennae threadlike and clubbed. 1 - 5 mm. Found with animal or vegetable matter.

Pyrochroidae - Fire-colored beetle - 15 species found throughout North America. Antennae sawtoothed and featherlike. 4.5 19 mm. Found at night on dead trees, logs or stumps.

Rhipiceridae - Cedar beetle - 6 species found from East to Southwest. Antennae sawtoothed to lamellate. 11 - 24 mm. Found with tree trunks or foliage.

Rhipiphoridae - Wedge-shaped beetle - 50 species found throughout North America. Antennae sawtoothed and comblike. 3.5 - 15 mm. Found with flowers.

Rhizophagidae - Rhizophagid beetle - 56 species found throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. 1.5 - 3 mm. Found with dead bark, rotting wood or ant nests.

Rhysodidae - Wrinkled bark beetle - 8 species found mostly in East but also in Oregon and California. Slender body, antenna short, beadlike. 5.4 - 8.1 mm. Back is black or reddish and shiny. Body to rear of head is grooved. Wing cover is striated. Larvae bore beneath bark of decaying beech, ash, elm and pine. Adults found beneath bark and often hibernate in groups. On dead bark at night.

Salpingidae - Narrow-waisted bark beetle - 34 species found mostly in North or South West. Antennae threadlike or beadlike. 2 - 21 mm. Found with bark or conifers, humus or flowers.

Scaphidiidae - Shining fungus beetle - 50 species found throughout North America but most in East. Spindle shaped and convex. Usually black and shiny with red spots. Forewing short and partially exposing pointed posterior of abdomen. Legs long and slender, antennae clubbed and curved back. 1.2 - 7 mm. Found in fungi, dead wood, rotting leaves and under bark. Play dead when disturbed or run with an uneven gait.

Scarabaeidae - Scarab beetle - 1,375 species found throughout North America. Antennae lamellate. 2 - 62 mm. Found with foliage, dung, flowers, fungi or humus.

Scolytidae - Ambrosia & bark beetle - 476 species found throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. .6 - 9 mm. Found with trees and attracted to lights.

Scydmaenidae - Antlike stone beetle - 181 species found throughout North America but most in East. Antennae clubbed. .6 - 2.5 mm. Found with bark, humus, tree holes or under debris.

Silphidae - Carrion beetle - 46 species found throughout North America. Some have broad forewing (Silpha genus, 10 - 24 mm) but others have short forewing exposing rear of abdomen (Nicrophorus genus). Black, often with yellow, orange or red markings. Body usually soft and flattened, antennae clubbed with last 2 or 3 segments with fine hairs. 1.5 - 35 mm. Usually found on carrion or decaying vegetation as adults or larvae. They are large beetles and brightly colored. Nocrophorus genus are called burying or Sexton beetles because they burrow under small dead animals such as mice and bury them.

Sphaeriidae - Minute bog beetle - 3 species found in East, Texas, California and Washington. Antennae clubbed. .5 - .8 mm. Found with mud or under debris near water.

Sphaeritidae - Sphaeritid beetle - 1 specie found from Alaska to California. Antennae clubbed. 3.6 - 5.6 mm. Found with fungi, dung, under bark, on moss or in sap flows.

Sphindidae - Dry-fungus beetle - 6 species found from East to Colorado and California. Antenna clubbed. 1.5 - 3 mm. Found with slime molds, shelf fungi, logs or stumps.

Staphylinidae - Rove beetle - Elongated and slender.Forewing short exposing rear abdominal segments which are often bent upward. Antennae threadlike to clubbed and curved back. .7 - 25 mm. Large family of about 3,100 species and common throughout North America. Larger ones found on carrion, others found on the ground, often under debris, along shores of streams and lakes, under bark, in fungi, on flowers, in ant or termite nests or in decaying vegetation. They usually run fast with their rear abdomen bent up and they are good flyers. They can't sting but they can bite and are predators. A few feed on decaying vegetation and some are parasitoids.

Stylopidae - Twisted-winged parasite beetle - 56 species found throughout North America but most in East. Antennae fan-shaped or comblike. .5 - 4 mm. Found on or inside wasp or other host insect.

Telegeusidae - Telegeusid beetle - Resemble rove beetle (Staphylinidae), body elongated and slender. Antennae threadlike and short. 5 - 8 mm. 3 very rare species found in Arizona and California. Presumed to live under bark and attracted to light.

Tenebrionidae - Darkling beetle - 1300 species found throughout North America but most in West. Antennae threadlike and clubbed. 2 - 35 mm. Found with debris, fungus, under bark or on foliage.

Throscidae - Throscid beetle - 27 species found throughout North America. Antennae clubbed. 1.6 - 5 mm. Found with foliage or flowers.

Trogositidae - Bark-gnawing beetle - 55 species found throughout North America but most in West. Antennae clubbed. 2.3 - 22 mm. Found with dead wood, fungus or vegetable matter.

 

Collembola (Springtails;"glue peg")

No life cycle; chewing mouth; wingless; forked catapult under abdomen; elongated to oval body; nuisance pest.

Poduridae - Seashore springtail

Dermaptera (Earwigs; "skinwings")

Gradual life cycle; chewing mouth; wings short & leathery; elongated body; pincers at end of abdomen; occasional nuisance pest.

Forficulidae - European earwig

Diptera (Flies, gnats, midges & mosquitos;"Two wings")

Complete life cycle; one pair membranous wings; balance wing stubs in place of hind wings; small antennae; many are plant or animal pests, some suck blood.

Bombylidae - Bee fly

Simuliidae - Black fly

Calliphoridae - Blow fly

Tipulidae - Crane fly

Empididae - Dance fly

Tabanidae - Deer & horse fly

Anthomyiidae - Dung fly

Sarcophagidae - Flesh fly

Apioceridae - Flower-loving fly

Tephritidae - Fruit fly

Muscidae - House fly

Syrphidae - Hover fly

Dolichopodidae - Long-legged fly

Hippoboscidae - Louse fly

Bibionidae - March fly

Sciomyzidae - Marsh fly

Mydidae - Mydas fly

Pyrgotidae - Pyrgotid fly

Asilidae - Robber fly

Coelopidae - Seaweed fly

Ephydridae - Shore fly

Stratiomyidae - Soldier fly

Therevidae - Stilleto fly

Tachinidae - Tachinid fly

Conopidae - Thick-headed fly

Drosophilidae - Vinegar fly

Mycetophilidae - Fungus gnat

Ceratopogonidae - Punkie gnat

Chironomidae - Midge

Blephariceridae - Net-winged midge

Chaoboridae - Phantom midge

Culicidae - Mosquito

Ephemeroptera (Mayflies;"Short-lived wings")

Incomplete life cycle; chewing or vestigial mouth; long body and antenna; forewing much larger than hindwing; 3 long tail-like appendages; fish food source but sometimes nuisance.

Ephemeridae - Burrowing mayfly

Ephemerellidae - Mid-boreal mayfly

Baetidae - Small mayfly

Leptophlebiidae - Spinner mayfly

Heptageniidae - Stream mayfly

Hemiptera (True Bugs;"Half wings")

Gradual life cycle; sucking mouth in front of head; forewings leathery at base and membraneous at tip; wings overlap to form X; some are beneficial.

Notonectidae - Common backswimmer.

Corixidae - Water boatman

Reduviidae - Assassin bug

Cemididae - Bed bug

Belostomatidae - Giant water bug

Phymatidae - Jagged ambush bug

Tingidae - Oak lace bug

Miridae - Plant bug

Lygaeidae - Seed bug

Coreidae - Squash bug

Berytidae - Stilt bug

Pentatomidae - Stink bug

Gelastocoridae - Toad bug

Gerridae - Common water strider

Nepidae - Brown waterscorpion

Homoptera (Aphids, mealybugs, scales, whiteflies and hoppers; "Same wings")

Gradual life cycle; sucking mouth; wings often held roof-like over back; mouth under rear of head; pests.

Aphididae - Aphid

Cicadellidae - Leafhopper

Pseudoccidae - Long-tailed mealybug

Psyllidae - Psyllid

Diaspididae - Armored scale

Margarodidae - Giant scale

Cercopidae - Spittlebug

Membracidae - Treehopper

Aleyrodidae - Greenhouse whitefly

Hymenoptera (Bees, ants, sawflies and wasps; "Membrane wings")

Complete life cycle; chewing or sponging mouth; usually 2 pair of membranous wings, forewings larger than hindwings; narrow waist; larvae don't have crochets on pro-legs (stumpy-like legs); some pests, some beneficial.

Formicidae - Ant

Andrenidae - Andrenid bee

Anthophoridae - Anthophorid bee

Apidae - Apid bee (Carpenter, bumble and honey bees)

Colletidae - Yellow-faced and plasterer bee

Halictidae - Halictid bee

Megachilidae - Leafcutting bee

Melittidae - Melittid bee

Siricidae - Horntail

Argidae - Argid sawfly

Cephidae - Stem sawfly

Cimbicidae - Cimbicid sawfly

Diprionidae - Conifer sawfly

Pamphiliidae - Web-spinning and leaf-rolling sawfly

Pergidae - Pergid sawfly

Tenthredinidae - Common sawfly

Xyelidae - Xyelid sawfly

Braconidae - Braconid wasp

Chalcididae - Chalcid wasp

Chrysididae - Cuckoo wasp

Cynipidae - Gall wasp

Dryinidae - Dryinid wasp

Ichneumonidae - Ichneumon wasp

Mutillidae - Velvet-ant wasp

Orussidae - Parasitic wood wasp

Pelicinidae - Pelicinid wasp

Pompilidae - Spider wasp

Sclerogibbidae - Sclerogibbid wasp

Scoliidae - Scoliid wasp

Siricidae - Horntail wood wasp

Sphecidae - Astatine, sand-loving, organ-pipe mud dauber, thread-waisted and aphid wasp

Syntexidae - Cedar wood wasp

Tiphiidae - Tiphiid wasp

Torymidae - Torymid wasp

Trigonalidae - Trigonalid wasp

Vespidae - Yellow jacket, hornet and paper wasp

Xiphydriidae - Wood wasp

Isoptera (Termites)

Gradual life cycle; chewing mouth; long body with thick waist; beaded antenna; wings of equal size, when present; wood pest.

Hodotermitidae - Pacific coast termite

Rhinotermididae - Subterraneum termite

Lepidoptera (Moths and butterflies)

Complete life cycle; adults have siphoning probe and larvae usually have chewing mouth; crochets on pro-legs (stumpy legs); adults have large wings with scales; knobby antenna on butterflies and feathery antenna on moths; moth larvae usually pest and butterfly larvae usually benign.

Butterflies:

Apaturidae - Goatweed & Hackberry butterfly - Usually large and showy. Similar to brush-footed butterflies (Nymphalidae).

Danaidae - Milkweed butterfly - Large and usually brightly colored. Antennae are unscaled. Long-lived. Larvae feed on milkweed or similar which causes predators to be repelled. Larvae are smooth with fleshy filaments at each end and white or green with narrow dark rings. Pupae are stout and cylindrical and suspended. Butterflies are unable to withstand cold.

Hesperiidae - Skipper butterfly - Head as wide as thorax. They are small butterflies whose flight is extremely rapid and erratic. They are mostly rich browns or orange-brown. Larvae feeds on leaves and lives in a rolled leaf or nest of several leaves.

Libytheidae - Snout butterfly - Very few species. Front legs small in male but long in female.

Lycaenidae - Gossamer-winged butterfly - Many species. Small butterflies with notched eyes at base of antennae. Blues tend to be iridescent blue, coppers tend to be copper colored and hairstreaks often have hairlike tails on their rear wings. Sexes often different underneath but same on top. Many species rub their rear wings together. Eggs are flat. Larvae broad and their head small and retractible and their body often covered with velvety hairs. Larvae exudes liquid attractive to ants. Pupae short with underside flat. Pupae attached to plants or concealed in leaf litter or under bark.

Megathymidae - Giant skippers - Large, head smaller than thorax. Larvae bores into stems or fleshy leaves of yucca, agave and manfreda.

Nymphalidae - Brush-footed butterfly - Many species. Small to large. Bright to dull colored. Front legs short. Strong and rapid flight. Antennae are finely scaled. Larvae have branching spines and pupae often has projections and hangs.

Papilionidae - Swallowtail butterfly - Taillike projections from rear wings. Strong flyer which may include glides. Brightly colored such as yellows and black, greens and blue-greens. Adults often seen where there are lots of flowers but are often found near trees. Male swallowtails like to visit puddles or moist sand. Larva feeds on various trees, pawpaw, (carrots, parsley and related plants), spicebush and sassafras.

Parnassidae - Parnassian butterfly - Similar to Papilionidae but without taillike projections on hind wings. They are usually gray or white with dark marks and most have 2 small red eye spots on the hind wings. Wingspan is about 25 mm. Found mostly in West.

Pieridae - White, Sulphur & Orange-tip butterfly - Medium sized and usually white, yellow or orange marked with black. Anennae short and straight. Adults fly in continuous fluttering manner and are found along roadsides, in meadows and gardens. Eggs are elongated and upright. Larvae of Whites are a serious pest of cabbage and related plants. Larvae are slender with granulated skin which is often velvety. Pupae suspended upright by girdle.

Riodinidae - Metalmark butterfly - Small, most are tropical. Some have spots or lines of small, metallic scales. Front legs short in males but normal in females. Head is small with eyes notched at base of antennae. Antennae long and straight. Larvae either cylinder or broad and flattened and often with long hairs. Pupae covered with short hairs, stout and round and suspended, often with a girdle.

Satyridae - Arctic, Nymph & Satyr butterfly - White, tan, grey or black. Satyrs are almost all brown with darker eyespots on their wings. Wings often with eyespots. Antennae short and weakly clubbed. Front legs short. Flight usually jerky and bouncing. Often take refuge in grass or shrubs, if disturbed. Eggs nearly spheres with raised network of connecting ridges. Larvae spindle-shaped and tapered at each end with rear end often notched. Pupae smooth and usually suspended but some species pupate in cells or in ground litter.

Moths:

Arctiidae - Tiger moth

Ctenuchidae - Ctenuchid moth

Gelechiidae - Gelechid moth

Geometridae - Measuringworm moth

Incurvariidae - Fairy moth

Lasiocampidae - Tent caterpillar moth

Limacodidae - Slug caterpillar moth

Lymantriidae - Tussock moth

Noctuidae - Owlet moth

Notodontidae - Prominent moth

Pterophoridae - Plume moth

Psychidae - Bagworm moth

Pyralidae - Pyralid moth

Saturniidae - Giant silkworm moth

Sesiidae - Clear-winged moth

Sphingidae - Sphinx moth

Tineidae - Clothes moth

Tortricidae - Tortrix moth

Yponomeutidae - Ermine moth

Zygaenidae - Smoky moth

Mecoptera (Scorpionflies)

Complete life cycle; chewing mouth at end of long snout; fake scorpion tip at end of abdomen; wings often have dark bands or spots; beneficial.

Boreidae - Snow scorpionfly

 

Mallophaga (Chewing lice;"Wool to eat")

No life cycle; chewing mouth; flat body; large claws on legs to grasp hair or feathers of host; broad head; parasitic pest.

Philopteridae - Bird louse

 

Neuroptera (Lacewings and Antlions; "Nerve wings")

Complete life cycle; chewing mouth; 2 pair of large membranous wings with many cross veins; conspicuous antenna; beneficial.

Myrmeleontidae - Antlion

Hemerobiidae - Brown lacewing

Polystoechotidae - Giant lacewing

Chrysopidae - Green lacewing

Ascalaphidae - Owlfly

 

Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies; "Toothed")

Incomplete life cycle; chewing mouth; long body; short or bristlelike antenna; large bulging eyes; membranous tinted or patterned wings; dragonflies hold wings outstretched at rest while damselflies hold wings upright over body; beneficial.

Calopterygidae - Broad-winged damselfly

Coenagrionidae - Narrow-winged damselfly

Lestidae - Spread-winged damsel fly

Macromiidae - Belted and River skimmer - Belted are brown with light marks, found on boggy pond shores.

Cordulegastridae - Biddy and Flying adder dragonfly - Large black to brown with yellow marks, Small groups found along small streams.

Libellulidae - Common skimmer dragonfly

Aeshniudae - Darner dragonfly - Large (21/4" or 56 mm to 31/2" or 95 mm), most dark brown with blue or green markings, found around ponds or swamps.

Gomphidae - Clubtail dragonfly - Medium to large (2" or 50 mm to 3" or 80 mm), dark brown with yellow or green marks, like flat surfaces, found around streams or lake shores.

Corduliidae - Green-eyed skimmer dragonfly

Petuluridae - Grayback dragon fly - Large (3" or 80 mm), gray-brown (Eastern states), small streams or black (Western states), high elevations in mountains.

 

Orthoptera (Grasshoppers and Crickets; "Straight wings")

Gradual life cycle; chewing mouth; conspicuous antenna; forewings straight and narrow with parchment texture; hindlegs adapted for jumping; most are pests.

Gryllacrididae - Camel cricket

Gryllotaopidae - Mole cricket

Gryllidae - True cricket

Tetrigidae - Pygmy grasshopper

Acrididae - Short-horned grasshopper

Tettigoniidae - Katydid and Long-horned grasshopper

 

Plecoptera (Stoneflies;"Plaited wings")

Incomplete life cycle; chewing or vestigial mouth; hindwings larger than forewings; 2 short appendages at end of abdomen; larvae are fish food; beneficial.

Pteronarcidae - Giant stonefly

Perlidae - Common stonefly

 

Psocoptera (Psocids and Book lice)

TBD

TBD - Psocid

TBD - Book louse

 

Siphonaptera (Fleas;"Tube without wings")

Complete life cycle; sucking mouth; wingless; body laterally flat; jumping hind legs; inconspicuous antenna; parasitic pest.

Policidae - Cat, Human and Oriental rat flea

 

Thysanoptera (Thrips;"Tassel wings")

Gradual life cycle; sucking/rasping mouth; long body; short antenna; narrow wings fringed with hair or no wings; pest.

 

Aeolothripidae - Banded thrip

Thripidae - Common thrip

 

Thysanura (Bristletails;"Tassel tail")

No life cycle; chewing mouth; long flat body sometimes with scales; 3 appendages at end of abdomen; long antenna; wingless; household pest.

Machilidae - Common bristletail

Lepismatidae - Firebrat and Silverfish

 

Trichoptera (Caddisflies;"Hairwings")

Complete life cycle; chewing or no mouth; wings held roof-like over back; antenna long and slender; beneficial.

Lemnephilidae - Northern caddisfly

Leptoceridae - Long-horned caddisfly

 

Mollusca (Slugs and Snails)


Last edited: 03/07/98 02:04 PM

 

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